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About Us

ABOUT LOUISVILLE MEGA CAVERN: HISTORY

What once started out as Louisville Crushed Stone and one of the best kept secrets in the city of Louisville, Kentucky has now been revealed to the public. It was created by a massive limestone quarry—with miners blasting out a mind-boggling amount of rock for over 42 years during the middle of the 20th century. It was acquired in 1989 by private investors who saw the potential to develop a portion of the cavern into an environmentally-conscious high security commercial storage facility.

Since the early 1990’s, a massive amount of recycled concrete, brick, block, rock and dirt were (and continue to be) off-loaded at the cavern to fill in the holes and create floors and internal roads. Construction to carve out offices and storage spaces is ongoing, making just a dent in the more than 4,000,000 square feet of space. Even though it’s underground, the Louisville MEGA Cavern is actually the largest building in the state of Kentucky—and by tonnage is the largest recycling center in the state. Now you can experience all the wonder and adventure of this unique attraction.

LOUISVILLE IS HOME TO ONE OF THE LARGEST CAVERNS IN THE UNITED STATES...SO LARGE, IT HAS BEEN DUBBED THE "MEGA” CAVERN!
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INTERESTING FACTS

ABOUT LOUISVILLE MEGA CAVERN: ORIGIN

The mine was founded by Ralph Rogers back in the 1930’s. He was a great visionary who saw the need for highways in this country especially to the south. He was said to be able to look at a site and tell you just how much rock that he could get out of it. His business did very well; especially back during the Depression of the 1930’s when the government put people back to work by supporting the construction of new roads and bridges.

The Louisville Mega Cavern is a 100 acre limestone cavern capable of shrugging off a 260-mph tornado and boasts a constant 58-degree temperature. The cavern under the Louisville Zoo has remained virtually dormant since the last load of limestone was mined nearly 20 years ago to build bridges and roads across the Midwest.
In the post 9-11 world, government agencies and high security businesses are looking for ultimate security, and the Underground offers just that. With limestone and earth between the cavern ceiling and the ground above, the cavern could withstand the most violent tornado or an airliner crash.

During the Cuban missile crisis in the early 1960s, state officials made plans in case of nuclear attack to house 50,000 people in the cavern because it’s a natural bomb shelter. With four entrances, positioned close together, access is easily controlled by a series of security check points.

Geologists say that this is the safest place in Kentucky,” Jim Lowry, the co-owner, said.

Direction to our cavern